Sean on Standing Tuck Troubleshooting

Having trouble with a standing tuck?

As a coach when I have an athlete having issues with a standing, I look at their physical conditioning. If an athlete can perform a standing tuck with precise technique on apparatuses such as tumble trak or air track, but are having issues on the floor, they have an athletic deficiency in some aspect.

To perform a standing tuck properly, requires an athlete to have many different types of strength and muscular reactions so you want to make sure you train them properly. Explosive hamstrings and glute muscles are absolutely crucial to propelling the athlete off the mat quickly and powerfully, along with creating the “hip lift” movement. Exercises such as box jumps, depth jumps , and broad jumps are some explosive movement exercises that help tremendously.

Moving along the upper body, a strong core to maintain the hollow body position, plank holds, plank ups, and ab roll outs are some things I use to help strengthen the abdominals and the intercostals (rib muscles). In outs with paper plates, and hanging leg raises to activate and isolate the knee drive, which help train the hip flexor which pull the legs up into a tucked position. Finishing off with fast arms, which require fast and flexible shoulders. Front raises and lateral raises with ankle weights around wrists for strength, along with resistance band work goes a long way.

The other part I like to reinforce is the stick. Single leg box jump landing on one leg, keeping it small about 8-12 high. Allowing the calves and ankles isolated training create a strong stable base for landings. Jump squats and lunges are daily to keep the absorbing motion strong and stable.

David on Standing Tuck Drills

Standing tucks might just be my favorite skill to teach, but at the same time, can be one of the most taxing skills to get accomplished.

Some of the most common problems I see with standing tucks are the dropping of the chest in the entry, lack of use of the arms, throwing the head back, and heels being driven to the rear, instead of over the head. All of these can be resolved by simple basic drills. Some of these problems can be fixed two or three at a time with one drill. You just have to be patient.

A good drill to start out with is a basic straight jump onto a box mat, or panel mat. Try to encourage the arms being used, and the actual jump into the skill. If your athlete is going into this skill through a good athletic stance, this will help promote going through the right form into the jump, before the tuck.

Another drill I like to use, that also helps condition the athlete’s core, is to stack mats between the lower and midpoint of the athletes back, and then have them jump into a candlestick position, that will tuck at the top. Just make sure that once the athlete is driving their hips through the candlestick position, to drive their shins and toes over their head to hit the tuck position. You’re most common problem with standing tucks would be landing short. If you are able to teach a good shin and toe drive that goes over the head, this will help stop your athlete from landing with too much weight in the front part of their feet. Also, this will save ankles for the long run.

Too often, standing tucks can be the most rushed skill for an athlete to have. Let’s just all take the time to teach them correctly, so we then can be able to teach all the other skills that will come after.

Shea on Standing Tuck Technique

The standing tuck is an equal combination of power and technique, without one the other cannot be accomplished. The proper athletic stance to start allows for the core, glutes and hamstrings to become engaged. Following this position the arms need to lead the body up so I’m often telling my kids to speed up their arms. This allows for explosiveness from the legs all the way through their toes. Kids will often focus on the tuck too early which limits the full use of arms and legs so I like to have them jump into a candlestick position onto a raised surface. The “feel” of the proper explosion onto a raised surface allows the this for the athlete. The lifting of the hips over the shoulders, rather than the shoulders below the hips, is what provides the proper timing for the rotation of the the tuck. The knees should be bent, but not the feet bent to the bottom. As the rotation completes the landing should be that of the chest coming up to allow the feet to come to the floor. Often times the athlete wants to look for the floor and kick out resulting in a short, improper landing. Providing the athlete with a specific place to look at the start and finish of the skill can help their awareness throughout the skill.